HERstories Women of 1830s Caldwell

 1830s Herstory Sites Around Caldwell

 

“Remember the ladies” at HERstory sites. Seemingly insignificant spots reveal stories of 1830s womenfolk. This Undertold Stories Project salutes the girls and women who played a part in the Cleveland Family’s years in Caldwell, including a schoolgirl who unhesitatingly saved the future president’s life. Special attention is given to the corps of midwives and baby nurses who provided health care at the Cleveland home, and infant care to the future president. Watch for more content coming soon to the 1830s HERstory Sites section!

 

Mary DeCamp Shippen site #1

DeCamp Bus #33

Take notice of the green and white “#33 DeCamp” buses navigating up and down Bloomfield Avenue, a modern reminder of the DeCamp family that Mary was born into. Mary was a woman up against the odds after losing her husband, with three small children and no income. Then her father, who was raising the children, died. It was at that point that Mary DeCamp Shippen took up midwifery for decades. She, together with Naomi Baldwin, served as midwives at the birth of Grover Cleveland.

 

Naomi Baldwin site #1

Mountain Avenue, North Caldwell (aka County Rt 527)

Driving or walking on this road, take a moment to recall that Naomi Baldwin, who along with Mary DeCamp Shippen, was a midwife at Grover Cleveland’s birth, was well-known in the community to the degree that this road was called, “the Road to Aunt Polly Baldwin’s Place” or “Aunt Naomi’s Lane” in her lifetime.

 

Naomi Baldwin site #2

Baldwin Homestead: (currently privately owned)

153 Mountain Avenue, North Caldwell

Naomi resided here for 63 years, from her marriage in 1808 to her death in 1871. To find it, travel approximately ¾ mile north from the intersection of Mountain and Bloomfield Avenue. She would have traveled one mile to help deliver Grover Cleveland at 207 Bloomfield Avenue, Caldwell.

 

Naomi Baldwin site #3 & #4

First Presbyterian Church at Caldwell

326 Bloomfield Avenue, Caldwell

Wedding Site and Grave

March 10, 1808, Naomi Baldwin, Age 21 to Noah Baldwin, Age 24. Original church destroyed by fire, circa 1875 church rebuilt on site. Grave at the Old Burying Ground: Naomi Baldwin Died Sep 22, 1871, age 85

 

Naomi Baldwin site #5

Online: Find A Grave

Leave virtual flowers for Naomi at: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/95768631/naomi-baldwin

HERstories in Detail

Learn more about 1830s womenfolk of Caldwell with these tributes authored by caretaker, Sharon Farrell. These stories emerged using lists of names, birth dates, death dates, homes lived in, occupations, news stories, census records and genealogies. Some was culled from online archives, but the majority came from an invaluable collection of research submitted by Dr. Beverly White Crifasi over a course of decades. Dorothy Budd Bartle, past president of the GCBMA, together with Dr. Crifasi initiated research on the midwives in a 1999 article, still used for scholarly reference today.

 

 

 

Herstory Narrative: Mary Decamp Shippen

born ca. 1788 / married ca. 1809 / died ca. 1850

Midwife at birth of Grover Cleveland, March 18, 1837

Mary was born in ca. 1788 as the eighth child of nine to Keturah Clark DeCamp and Aaron DeCamp in Centerville, now called Roseland. Married in Caldwell at about age 21 in 1809 to John Beach Shippen (1771-1818), of the famous Shippen family in Philadelphia. The couple took up residence in Caldwell at the corner of Brookside Ave and Bloomfield Avenue in a house John built. Scarcely nine years into their marriage, John Shippen died suddenly while on a business trip to Sussex County NJ. Contemporaneous accounts of his death in New York Genealogical Society records say, “he suddenly dropped dead.” His remains were never returned to Caldwell. Three children were born during the brief marriage, aged three, eight, and nine when John died in 1818.

 

Mary’s father, Aaron DeCamp raised the children at his home in Centerville (now Roseland) after John Shippen’s death. In 1827, upon the death of her father, Mary began working regularly as a midwife; her children were now 12, 17 and 18. Three years later, on the 1830 census, “Mary Shippen” is listed as “head of family” with her three children residing with her, but we have no record of the exact address.

 

In 1837, Mary DeCamp Shippen and Naomi Baldwin delivered Grover Cleveland. As President of the United States, up until 1899, Grover Cleveland would correspond with Lucretia Shippen, daughter of Mary Shippen annually near his birthday, paying tribute to Luctretia’s mother who had aided in his birth.

 

Mary DeCamp Shippen died many years before Grover Cleveland took office, approx. 1850, possibly in New York City at approx. age 63. Mary was survived by her three children. Samuel Shippen Carpenter (1809-1878), Lucretia Shippen (1810-1899) and Benjamin DeCamp Shippen (1815-1896.)

 

NOTES for Mary’s Herstory:

Documentation of Mary’s life has been hit or miss. We found gems such as an 1830 census sheet and an article quoting her daughter. Other than that, much of the information was contradictory or unconfirmed. Public record of the men in her family was slightly better, but only by a slim margin. Despite this, we will keep searching. Above is what can be gathered thus far as a tribute to Mary.

 

 

Herstory Narrative: Naomi Baldwin

born 1786 / married 1808 / died 1871

Midwife at birth of Grover Cleveland, March 18, 1837

Naomi’s life story began in Montclair, then known as ‘Cranetown.’ Her mother, Esther Crane Baldwin delivered Naomi on Sunday, March 26th, 1786. Naomi was the seventh child born to Esther and Joseph Baldwin. The couple would, over time, have 10 children.

 

In Essex County of 1786, Crane and Baldwin households had grown to be a gigantic family tree with incredibly crowded leaves and deep roots. Naomi was surrounded by aunts, uncles, cousins, and so forth, some closely related and others barely—all part of an ancestry reaching back to the earliest European settlers to Newark NJ in 1666. Naomi’s future husband was himself born into a branch of Baldwins in Caldwell, while Naomi spent her girlhood as a ‘Cranetown Baldwin.’

 

Naomi moved from Cranetown to Caldwell at the age of 21 to marry her distant cousin, Noah Baldwin (1784-1832.) She took her wedding vows on Thursday, March 10th, 1808, just 16 days before her 22nd birthday, in the First Presbyterian Church at Caldwell. Bride and groom both carried the surname of the immense Baldwin clan, thus Naomi’s married name would remain the same as her single name. Noah was 24 years old and owned a home situated on a country road that served as a main connector through a sizable farming district of Caldwell. Naomi took up residence for the remainder of her life in that home. The road would come to be called “Aunt Naomi’s Lane” and, “The Road to Aunt Polly Baldwin’s Place.” This section of Caldwell would later become North Caldwell.

 

Her first twenty four years in the home were spent with her husband and growing family. Within a 20-year span, Naomi bore 10 children of which nine lived to adulthood. In 1832, after 24 years of marriage, Noah died at the young age of 48. Naomi was 46 and took on the role of raising her remaining youngest children, likely with help from some of the older children still living at home. The ages of her nine children—4, 7, 8, 11, 14, 16, 19, 21, 23—show that at least four were still quite young. 

 

Over the next four decades, Naomi would raise her children in the home and family would come to stay, some for long-term, some for short-term. As life progressed, census and death records show that some children remained through adulthood, some until death, and that varied family members would be added to the household—Naomi’s siblings from Cranetown would come, grandchildren and others would come. In her lifetime there were births in her home, as well as family deaths. Naomi never married again and was a skilled midwife for local families, including attending the noted birth of President Cleveland, Saturday, March 18, 1837, Caldwell.

 

On the day of Grover Cleveland’s birth, at an untold time, Naomi made the trek from her home on “Aunt Naomi’s Lane” to the Cleveland’s home one mile away. Likely someone had arrived at her door to beckon her and her response would likely have been rapid. Closely approaching her 51st birthday, Naomi had been capably running her household since the death of her husband five years before, providing added income through her employment as a midwife. She and another woman, Mary DeCamp Shippen, aided Mrs. Cleveland in delivering the future president in 1837.

 

She lived at her Caldwell (now North Caldwell) home for a total of 63 years, from marriage in 1808 to her death September 22nd, 1871, at age 85. She is interred at the Old Burying Ground of the First Presbyterian Church at Caldwell. At the time of her death, Naomi had 8 surviving children, 20 known living grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. Her progeny continues to grow today. Tallying an approximate count of her descendants would be a Herculean task, but it is on our radar as a possible project.

 

NOTES for Naomi’s Herstory:

Thanks are due to Dr. Beverly White Crifasi, Chairwoman of Caldwell’s Historic Preservation Commission*, for decades of organizing and disbursing data sets of genealogies, census records, death records, as well as spreadsheets of indexes she has personally created using local history books that had no indexes, or sparse unusable ones. Huzzah to HERstory too!  (*also, she is one of Naomi’s many great-great-great-granddaughters.)

 

Naomi’s eight surviving children at the time of her death were: Joseph Varnum Baldwin (1809-1892), Caleb Hilbert Baldwin (1810-1898), Noah Oscar Baldwin (1815-1899), Esther Crane Baldwin (1817-1881), Hannah Maria Baldwin Dobbins (1820-1886), Marcus Young Baldwin (1823-1904), Anna Louisa Baldwin (1825-1900) and Zenas Ashman Baldwin (1828-1903).

 

Naomi was pre-deceased by her husband Noah (died 1832); daughter, Hannah Maria Baldwin (died in infancy 1819); daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Baldwin Harrison (died 1850, age 37); granddaughter, Elizabeth Baldwin Harrison (died 1850, age one-year); and by granddaughter, Amelia Naomi Harrison (died 1855, age eight).

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY TO RESEARCH RESOURCES AND CALDWELL HISTORY

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY TO

RESEARCH RESOURCES AND CALDWELL HISTORY

Compiled by Beverly W. Crifasi

 

 

Shaded entries recommended for Caldwell history

 

Book/Journal Title Author/Editor/

Compiler

Date Notes Available Formats
Annotated Bibliography and Index of Atlases and Maps of New Jersey. Three volumes. Grametbaur, Agnes B. 1953 An index for the holdings of many major repositories including: NY Historical Society, NY Public Library, and Library of Congress; copyright protection Print & microfilm; Copies available at NJ State Library, Newark Library, & Rutgers Library.
Caldwell History from Pioneer Days. Unknown 1938 Possibly prepared by the Federal Writers Project, but authorship not proven; copyright protection. Unpublished See copy at local library
“The Caldwell Progress—Fiftieth Anniversary Edition.” Sullivan, John, Editor 1961 Published in 1961 by The Progress; this edition contains information on local organizations, govern­ment and history; copyright protection. Available on microfilm at local libraries.
Country Life in Fairfield, New Jersey 1887 to 1909. DeBaun, Roscoe W. 1957 Local Author; interesting memories of Fairfield and West Essex; copyright protection See copy at local library or interlibrary loan
Guide to the Manuscript Collections of the New Jersey Historical Society. Skemer, Donald C. and Morris, Robert C. (comps.). 1977 Classic reference; Copyright protection See copy at local library or interlibrary loan
Historic American Buildings Survey of New Jersey, Catalog. Bassett, William 1977 Helpful for using HABS date sheets, drawings and photographs for New Jersey, but try the LOC website first:

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/

See copy at local library or through interlibrary loan; materials online at Library of Congress
Historic Homes of West Caldwell, N. J. Harrity, Ralph; Editor 1976 Local author; Families and houses; out of print; see Hist. Society of West Caldwell; Copyright protection See copy at local library or interlibrary loan
Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey. Barber, J.W. and Henry Howe. 1844 Classic reference with early woodcut illustrations; provides historical perspective and information that is difficult to find in many histories; Public domain See copy at local library; PDF
History of Bergen and Passaic Counties. Clayton, W. Woodward and Nelson, William 1882 Compilation of the history of Dutch colonization of the Passaic River valley. Public domain. See copy at local library; PDF
History of Essex and Hudson Counties. Volume 1 Shaw, William H. (Compiler) 1881 A comprehensive picture of the development of Essex County; still the best; 1332 pages. Public domain. Local libraries; PDF
A History of the Horse Neck Riots. Vorwerk, Max K. 1948 Written as a Master’s thesis at Montclair State College and published the Caldwell Bicentennial Committee, 1976. Copyright protection See copy at local library or Montclair State University Library
History of the Oranges to 1921, Vol. 1-4. Pierson David Lawrence 1922 Excellent resource on local history; Public domain. Local libraries; PDF
History of the Oranges. Wickes, MD; Stephen 1892 Excellent and interesting description of early Essex County history. Public domain. Local libraries; PDF
Land and People: A Cultural Geography of Pre-Industrial New Jersey. Wacker, Peter. 1975 Wacker is an articulate, well-informed expert on the history of cultures in NJ; Copyright protection See copy at local library or through

interlibrary loan

Maps and Mapmakers of the Revolution. Guthorn, Peter J. 1966 Useful guide to maps of this period; Copyright protection See copy at local library or interlibrary loan
A Narrative and Descriptive Bibliography of New Jersey. Burr, Nelson R. 1964 The only general bibliography of New Jersey; helpful for doing research in New Jersey history; Copyright protection. See copy at local library or through interlibrary loan
New Jersey as a Colony and as a State. Lee, Francis Bazley 1903 A four volume history of New Jersey. Public domain. See copy at local library or interlibrary loan; PDF
New Jersey: A Guide to Its Present And Past. Federal Writers’ Project. 1939 Information about publications in this Depression era program; Copyright protection Print & Microfilm at some Libraries
Old Caldwell—A Retrospect. Norwood, Benjamin R. 1927 Local author. An interesting narrative account of West Essex history. Public domain. See copy at local library, interlibrary loan or PDF
Pre-Revolutionary Dutch Houses and Families in Northern New Jersey and Southern New York. Bailey, Rosalie Fellows. 1968 Classic reference; Reprint of 1936 Edition; out of print; Copyright protection See copy at local library or through interlibrary loan
A Puritan Heritage. [History of the First Presbyterian Church at Caldwell] Lockward, Lynn G. 1955 Local author. Possibly the best history of Caldwell with historical material pertaining to the West Essex area, Connecticut and England. Out of print; copyright protection. See copy at local library or interlibrary loan

Remembering the Caldwells

 

Collins, John 1998 Local author. Pictorial history, so it emphasizes the 20th century. Over 200 images. Copyright protection. In print; see copy at local library or interlibrary loan
Reminiscences of Montclair (NJ) Doremus, Philip 1908 Interesting recollections of Montclair residents, many are related to Caldwell families; public domain PDF; http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~genepool/montnj17.htm
Reminiscences of Montclair (NJ)

Watkins, S.C.G.

 

1929 Recollections of Montclair by dentist who moved to North Caldwell and practiced at Caldwell; public domain PDF; See copy at Montclair Public Library
The History and Gazetteer of New Jersey. Gordon, Thomas F. 1834

1973

Provides capsule histories of the several towns and townships of the state; Public domain. See copy at local library or interlibrary loan; PDF
The Story of New Jersey’s Civil Boundaries. 1606-1968 Snyder, John P.  1969 Basic and essential reference that must be consulted in documenting a historic house; covers the numerous changes in municipal boundaries; copyright protection See copy at local library or interlibrary loan

These Daring Disturbers of the Public Peace – The Struggle for Property and Power in Early New Jersey.

McConville, Brendan

 

1999 Prize winning history of events that began at Caldwell, spread through NJ and affected almost every family for decades. Paperback 2003; Copyright protection. In print; see copy at local library or interlibrary loan

West Essex: Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell, and Roseland

Poekel, Charles A. 1999 Primarily a pictorial history, so it emphasizes the 20th century. Over 200 images. Copyright protection. In print; see copy at local library or interlibrary loan

PDF refers to digital files downloaded to be read or printed from a computer. Those listed can be downloaded at Archive.org or the GCBMA  at no cost.

Life in Caldwell in 1837-41, The Cleveland Years – Quiz

Life in Caldwell in 1837-41,  The Cleveland Years

 

  1. How many people lived in Caldwell in 1840?
  2. 2000 b. 1436  c. 988  d. 250  e. 486

 

  1. Who else lived in Caldwell?
  2. Dutch Americans b. native Americans  c. black Americans  d. German Americans  e. Irish Americans f. Asian Americans  g. Hispanic Americans  f Hawaiian Americans

 

  1. Who else lived in Caldwell?
  2. rabbits b. bears  c. raccoons  d. deer  e. mountain lions f. foxes  g. rats  h. groundhogs i. squirrels j. moles k. bats,  l.  muskrats,  m. minks  n. opossums o. porcupines

 

  1. Where were stray domesticated animals kept until their owners picked them up?

 

  1. Each mature sheep today gives us about 30 lbs. Of wool. How many lbs did they give Caldwell farmers the 1830-40’s?

 

  1. Why did Caldwell farmers and drovers like oxen so much?

 

  1. Grover’s home in the old manse lacked which features?
  2. running water b. central heating c. electricity d. bathroom and toilet e. stove f. refrigerator g. washing machine h. screens i.telephone j. vacuum cleaner k. kerosene lamp.

 

  1. Which local social services did Caldwell have in 1840?
  2. police force b. fire department c. militia d. bank e. poor house f. hospital g. library h. board of health i. mayor and council  j. sewer plant l. public school system

 

  1. What is a tannery?
  2. beach club b. leather factory  c. paint store d. tea salon e. bakery

 

  1. What diseases did Caldwell residents have vaccinations for?
  2. small pox  b. measles  c. Whooping cough d. diphtheria  e. tuberculosis g. cholera  g. typhoid
  3. fever  h. influenza i. tetnus j. polio  k. malaria l. German measles

 

 

 

Life in Caldwell in the 1830-40s    The Answers!

 

 

  1. 250 people, Caldwell included then all the surrounding towns as well.

 

  1. Hawaiian Americans are not recorded and the last names in the census suggest they were not present.

 

  1. Mountain lion; the last one was killed on Roseland Avenue in 1832.  Almost all the predatory animals were hunted out and killed by the farmers to protect their live stock.

 

  1. Stray domestic animals were kept on the Green, now the corner of Roseland and Bloomfield Avenue. Until the 1870s domestic animals were fenced out of farms and gardens and  not fenced in to pastures and farms and ranches.  Most animals came home to be milked and fed.

 

  1. About 9 lbs for a mature ram; modern animal husbandry began in the 18th century without understanding genetics, just careful examination and selection of characteristics.  Sheep doubled in weight on average from 1740-1840s.  Also, crop rotation with winter crops, allowing animals to graze and fertilize the fields but not let them lie fallow every third year, meant that there was food for the animals all winter long (and for people), so all the animals did not have to be slaughtered each fall and could grow bigger and heavier (and wooly).

 

  1. Oxen, unlike horses, have cloven feet. Cloven feet meant they could walk on rocky ground without splitting their hooves  and had good traction.  Have you ever tried to dig a hole in Caldwell?  Oxen can also walk at a steady pace for longer distances pulling their loads.  Oxen do not, however, back up and need a wide space to turn around.

 

  1. Grover’s mom and servant had none of those aides. Stoves to burn wood for cooking were invented by Benj. Thompson in 1833;  improved and produced in 1834 by Philo Stewart (the Oberlin Stove) but were expensive and not readily available until a decade later.  Kerosene lamps became available after kerosene was discovered in the 1850s.

 

  1. None of those services except the militia. Caldwell was incorporated in 1892; before the services if they existed were provided by the county or the larger Caldwell.

 

  1. Tanneries were “factories” where animal skims were treated to produce leather. The Caldwells had many trees to provide the bark, animals their hides, and seasonal labor.  Tanneries tan hides by soaking the flesh off with acids made from tree bark.  They stank.  Tanneries were not permitted in cities whenever possible, the beginning of public health laws.

 

  1. Only one, smallpox. That vaccination was achieved by giving a person a mild case of cow pox.  Jenner, the early advocate  for small pox vaccination,  was born in 1749 and died in 1796.  There was no knowledge of germs just what appeared to be a better protection from the disease among workers with cows.  Any large gathering of people, without social distancing,  makes spreading disease easier.  For example,  Washington almost lost the continental army to smallpox; he made the army be vaccinated while in Morristown.  During the Civil War Lincoln caught smallpox; the Confederate army was plagued with malaria and the Union army with measles.  They were all deadly diseases at that time.   Smallpox is the only one now very rarely experienced.

 

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GROVER CLEVELAND GEOGRAPHY QUIZ

GROVER CLEVELAND GEOGRAPHY QUIZ

 

  1. WHERE ARE THE CLEVELAND MOUNTAINS?

 

  1. WHERE DID THE CLEVELAND FAMILY MOVE TO AFTER LEAVING CALDWELL?

 

  1. WHEN AMERICAN BUSINESSMEN STAGED A COUP AND OVERTHREW A SMALL COUNTRY THEY CONVINCED THE SEATE TO ANNEX THE COUNTRY. CLEVELAND VETOED THE ANNEXATION AND LED THE FIGHT AGAINST AMERICAN IMPERIALISM.

WHAT COUNTRY WAS THAT?

 

  1. GROVER CLEVELAND VISITED THIS CITY TO MAKE A SPEECH AT THE COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. WAHT CITY WAS THAT?

 

  1. CLEVELAND’S FIRST ELECTED PUBIC OFFICE WAS IN WHAT COUNTY IN WHAT STATE?

 

  1. THE DEMOCRATIC NOMINATING CONVENTION IN 1888 WAS SO HOT DELEGATES TIED RED BANDANAS AROUND THEIR NECKS TO ABSORB THE SWEAT THE BANDANAS’ DYE RAN AND THE DELEGATES BECAME KNOWN AS “RED NECKS”. WHAT WAS THAT CITY?

 

7  GREAT BRITAIN WAS ATTEMPTING TO EXPAND ITS HOLDINGS IN LATIN AMERICA BY FORCING A BOUNDARY SHIFT.  PRESIDENT CLEVELAND INVOKED THE MONROE DOCTRINE AND THE THREAT STOPPED THE BRITISH IMPERIALISTS.  WHAT LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRY WAS BEING THREATENED BY BRITISH IMPERIALISM?

 

  1. WHAT TERRITORIES BECAME STATES DURING PRESIDENT CLEVELAND’S TERMS IN OFFICE?

 

  1. GREY GABLES, A CLEVELAND HOME COMPOUND, BECAME THE SUMMER WHITE HOUSE. IN WHAT STATE WAS GREY GABLES?

 

  1. AFTER HIS SECOND TERM PRESIDENT CLEVELAND RETIRED TO WHAT TOWN AND STATE?

 

  1. PRESIDENT CLEVELAND TOOK A BOAT RIDE TO HAVE SOME SURGERY DONE IN PRIVATE. WHAT BODY OF WATER WAS THAT?

 

  1. PRESIDENT CLEVELAND USED AN INJUNCTION AND FEDERAL TROOPS TO STOP THE PULLMAN WORKERS’ STRIKE. WHERE?

 

  1. WHERE WERE THE CLEVELANDS MARRIED?

 

14.TO PROTECT THE GRASS, A LAW WAS PASSED IN 1882 TO PREVENT TRESPASSING BY DEMONSTRATING GROUPS.  WHEN JACOB S. COXEY’S ARMY, THE FIRST MASS LABOR PEACEFUL DEMONSTRATION, ARRIVED THE POLICE ARRESTED THE LEAERS AND THE MOUNTED POLIE BEAT THE FOLLOWERS WITH BILLIE CLUBS.  WHERE DID THIS EVENT TAKE PLACE?

 

  1. PRESIDENT CLEVELAND WAS A GOVERNOR AS WELL. IN WHICH STATE?

 

 

 

ANSWERS TO CLEVELAND GEOGRAPHY QUIZ

 

  1. IN NORTHERN YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND. CLEVELAND DEVELOPED FROM “CLIFFSLAND”, THE LOCAL NAME.  THERE IS ALSO A CLEVELAND NATIONAL FOREST IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GIVEN THAT NAME BY PRESIDENT TEDDY ROOSEVELT IN HONOR OF HIS FRIEND GROVER.  THERE ARE TWO MORE CLEVELAND MOUNTAINS. ONE IN MONTANA AND ONE IN ALASKA.

 

  1. FAYETTEVILLE, NEW YORK. GROVER’S FATHER SERVED IN SEVERAL PARISHES IN THE REGION NEAR THE ERIE CANAL.  THE CLEVELANDS TRAVELLED FROM CALDWELL TO FAYETTEVILLE BY WAGON, HUDSON RIVER STEAM BOARD AND THE ERIE CANAL.

 

  1. HAWAII. CLEVELAND INVITED THE OVERTHROWN QUEEN TO THE WHITE HOUSE.

 

  1. CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. THE EXPOSITION NOT ONLY HONORED THE MEMORY OF CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS BUT ALSO FEATURED BUFFALO BILL AND THE WILD WEST SHOW.

 

  1. CLEVELAND WAS THE HANGING SHERIFF OF ERIE COUNTY, NEW YORK. HE EXECUTED TWO MEN AS PART OF THE JOB.

 

  1. SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI.

 

  1. VENEZUELA.

 

  1. UTAH, ON JANUARY 4, 1896. CLEVELAND WAS THE END OF HIS SECOND TERM; MOST OF THE TERRITORIES IN THE UPPER NORTHWEST WERE VOTED IN BY THE REPUBLICANS DURING THE PRECEDING TERM.

 

  1. MASSACHUSETTS. THE COMPOUND IS ON THE CAPE COD CANAL AND WHEN SOLD LATER BECAME A RESORT HOTEL.

 

  1. PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY. IN HIS RETIREMENT, GROVER BECAME A TRUSTEE OF THE LOCAL COLLEGE.

 

  1. PULLMAN, ILLINOIS. MAY 11, 1894.

 

  1. THE LONG ISLAND SOUND. IN THE SUMMER OF 1893 DURING THE GREATEST DEPRESSION OF THE 19TH C, HE HAD A CANCER REMOVED FROM HIS JAW AND PART OF THE JAW ITSELF, ALL DONE FROM THE INSIDE SO HIS FACE WOULD LOOK THE SAME;   THE MOUSTACHE COVERED THE AREA OF THE SURGERY.  IT WAS A BIG SECRET.

 

  1. IN THE WHITE HOUSE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OR WASHINGTON, D. C. THE ONLY BACHELOR PRESIDENT TO E MARRIED IN THE WHITE HOUSE.

 

  1. THE CAPITOL, WASHINGTON D. C. 1894. COXEY WAS PUSHED DOWN THE STEPS ONTO THE GRASS AND ARRESTED FOR TRESPASSING  COXEY SAID, “ I APPRECIATE AS WELL AS ANYONE ELSE THE FACT THAT THE PRESERVATION OF THE GRASS AROUND THE CAPITOL IS OF MORE IMPORTANCE THAN SAVING THOUSANDS FROM STARVATION.”

 

  1. NEW YORK. HE ROSE FROM MAYOR OF BUFFALO TO BE GOVERNOR TO BE PRESIDENT IN JUST THREE YEARS.

 

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Cleveland’s Caldwell – Quiz

Cleveland’s Caldwell

 

  1. Names the towns that were part of Caldwell when Cleveland lived here, 1837-1841?

 

  1. Caldwell, West Caldwell, Roseland, Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell, Verona, Cedar Grove, and parts of West Orange and Livingston.

 

  1. How many people lived in New Jersey in 1830s?

 

  1. 320,823. New Jersey grew only slowly; in 1830 Kentucky’s population already had grown to 560,000 and Tennessee’s to 422,000.

 

  1. How many churches were there in Caldwell borough in 1837?

 

  1. 1. The First Presbyterian Church at Caldwell.  In 1848 the Baptist Church became the second church in Caldwell and,  because of tragic fire, the oldest one still extant.

 

  1. What did these New Jersey folk do?  a. Colonel Zebulon Pike?
  2. James Marshall?

 

  1. Pike climbed a peak in Colorado, Marshall discovered gold in California. Very many N.J. people went west.

 

  1. In the 1830’s Newark was still New Jersey’s largest city. How big?

 

  1. 10, 973.  There were no other towns larger than 4,000 souls.  Newark was just about 3,000 people larger than Caldwell is now!

 

  1. The newly formed Temperance Leagues became a threat to the Caldwell economy. Why?

 

  1. Apple cider was one of the largest “industries”. Much cider was known as “New Jersey” lightning as it aged into hard cider.

 

  1. In the 1830s people were growing mulberry trees as fast as possible. Why?

 

  1. To feed the silk worms at the start of the silk industry in Paterson.

 

  1. The Marquis de Lafayette visited Caldwell in 1824 and gave the town a large gift. What gift?

 

  1. A cannon from the Barbary Coast wars. It was placed on the green.  It was also stolen in 1968.

 

  1. The Great Road, Bloomfield Avenue today, had opened Caldwell to trade, especially iron from the Morris County forges, wooden products and farm products. What came back from Newark and points east?

 

  1. People going west; wagon trains of 50 wagons, families bulling handcarts, even a dad pushing the family kids in a wheelbarrow. Over farming, deforestation, and environmental changes forced people to go West where there was new, free land, and the soil was not ruined.  New Jersey was only growing because of new immigrants and their new skills replaced the small farmers.

 

  1. The election of 1840 saw the building of a campaign structure on the green. What was that structure and for whom?

 

  1. A log cabin for William Henry Harrison rallies—and Tyler Too!

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Coming of Age: Women in 19th C. America – Quiz

Coming of Age:  Women in 19th C. America

 

  1. Under the New Jersey Constitution of 1776 women could and did vote in New Jersey elections. True or False?

 

  1. In 1837 education for women changed. Why?

 

  1. Women developed new items of clothing. What were they?

 

  1. Women began to control fertility. How many babies did the average woman have in 1800? In 1900?

 

  1. What changed in women’s lives the most in the 19th C?

 

  1. One woman changed women’s footwear. Who was that great reformer?

 

  1. With gradual abolition the new law in New Jersey after 1804, how long did girls have to serve their parents’ masters before they actually became free?

 

  1. How many women joined the political parties in the 1800s?

 

  1. When the second “Great Awakening” religious revival swept America in the late 1830s and 40s, what roles did women play?

 

  1. One great invention changed women’s lives in the 1840s, 50s and 60s—the cast iron stove. How much wood and coal did it take per week to use the new stoves?

 

 

 

 

Women in the 19th C   Answers

 

  1. True, largely because the Constitution of 1776, drafted in great hurry, did not differentiate by gender.

 

  1. Oberlin College became the first Co-ed private college and Michigan State University became the first public university to become Co-ed.

 

  1. Underwear—under “pants” created by Amelia Bloomer because hoop skirts would fly up exposing women. And the corset, to give mature women younger shapes.

 

  1. in 1800 women had on average 7 live births, 1/3 -1/2 would not survive until age 5. In 1900 3 ½ live births on average for white women;  black women and immigrant women had about 7.

 

  1. In 1800 the dominant life was a shared life at the family farm or business—shared work, shared tasks, shared migration There was no working class except slaves so few people worked outside of their homes or home businesses, shops were generally in the home and families in the cities gardened in their yards.

In 1900, the industrial revolution had created out of house/home work as the norm, wage earning out of the home, “women’s skills” for work outside the home in the wage economy, married women’s leisure, gender separate lives as  the new norms.

 

  1. Queen Victoria, who came to the throne the year Steven Grover Cleveland was born (1837).  When Victoria and Albert went to the country palace at Balmoral in Scotland and tried to hike in the heather together, her fabric shoes offered neither support nor dryness.  She commanded sensible shoes, made of leather—women would no longer be barefoot in summer!  The Victorian Age was afoot!

 

  1. Until they were 21; their brother until age 25. since the average age at death was about 40 something, about half their lives– and without education or literacy or skills or freedom.  In fact, many masters sold these people to Southerners before they reached their “freedom” age.  Being “free” did not mean becoming voting citizens necessarily.

 

  1. None. Even New Jersey women were amended out of the suffrage in subsequent constitutions. Political parties became all male  organizations with men’s social bonding,rituals, and participation.

 

  1. Women created women’s religious organizations, taught Sunday schools, organized charities and betterment societies (the Caldwell Women’s Club began as a Betterment Society)> won the franchise for widows in school board elections, spoke in public meetings confronted drunks, rowdies, family abusers and the like, demanded abolition and temperance, formed American Female Moral Reforn Societies (445 chapters), publicly shunned male sinners and began to shop and bank without their husbands.

 

  1. 242 pounds of coal, 14 pounds of kindling, and generating 27 pounds of ashed to clean. But stoves had reservoirs after the 1860s and hot water was always available—provided you kept it filled!  Sewing machines became available by the late 1840s into the 50s and soon women were buying patterns made of paper and making their own clothes.  The stove, by the way, required 54 minutes of work each day to keep it running:   that is emptying ash, replenishing coal, blacking and polishing the stove and so on.

 

  1. business—shared work, shared tasks, shared migration There was no working class except slaves so few people worked outside of their homes or home businesses, shops were generally in the home and families in the cities gardened in their yards.

In 1900, the industrial revolution had created out of house/home work as the norm, wage earning out of the home, “women’s skills” for work outside the home in the wage economy, married women’s leisure, gender separate lives as  the new norms.

 

  1. Queen Victoria, who came to the throne the year Steven Grover Cleveland was born (1837).  When Victoria and Albert went to the country palace at Balmoral in Scotland and tried to hike in the heather together, her fabric shoes offered neither support nor dryness.  She commanded sensible shoes, made of leather—women would no longer be barefoot in summer!  The Victorian Age was afoot!

 

  1. Until they were 21; their brother until age 25. since the average age at death was about 40 something, about half their lives– and without education or literacy or skills or freedom.  In fact, many masters sold these people to Southerners before they reached their “freedom” age.  Being “free” did not mean becoming voting citizens necessarily.

 

  1. None. Even New Jersey women were amended out of the suffrage in subsequent constitutions. Political parties became all male  organizations with men’s social bonding,rituals, and participation.

 

  1. Women created women’s religious organizations, taught Sunday schools, organized charities and betterment societies (the Caldwell Women’s Club began as a Betterment Society)> won the franchise for widows in school board elections, spoke in public meetings confronted drunks, rowdies, family abusers and the like, demanded abolition and temperance, formed American Female Moral Reforn Societies (445 chapters), publicly shunned male sinners and began to shop and bank without their husbands.

 

  1. 242 pounds of coal, 14 pounds of kindling, and generating 27 pounds of ashed to clean. But stoves had reservoirs after the 1860s and hot water was always available—provided you kept it filled!  Sewing machines became available by the late 1840s into the 50s and soon women were buying patterns made of paper and making their own clothes.  The stove, by the way, required 54 minutes of work each day to keep it running:   that is emptying ash, replenishing coal, blacking and polishing the stove and so on.

 

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Cleveland Week Home-Based Activities

1. Enjoy some apple-based treats or beverages, in tribute to local Caldwell hero, Phebe Crane. In 1840, at thirteen years old, she rescued Grover Cleveland from a moving vehicle on Bloomfield Avenue. An ox-drawn wagon heavily loaded with local apples (world-famous for making delicious “Newark Cyder”) nearly ended the future president’s life when he was barely more than a toddler.
2. Read the Constitution, and the Monroe Doctrine.  Some of Cleveland’s more famous writings reference excerpts from the Constitution. Cleveland vetoed more measures than all the presidents before him combined, multiplied by two, and then some. These numerous vetoes often included detailed explanations of why he was rejecting the proposed legislation, repeatedly citing sections of the Constitution, or explaining that he could find nothing in the Constitution to warrant the bill. He invoked the Monroe Doctrine in foreign relations; during an intensifying border dispute between Venezuela and Great Britain, during the Cuban Insurrection against Spain, and referenced it in his message to Congress in his analysis of the U.S.’s military dealings in Hawaii.
3. Eat corned beef and cabbage! It was one of Cleveland’s favorites. A story from Cleveland himself, tells of an evening in the White House when the familiar scent permeated into his dining room. Inquiring the wait staff what it was, they apologized and said the housekeeping staff was eating this simple meal. The president, who often lamented the “fancy French stuff” he was served, traded his plate of Chef-cooked fare for a plate from the staff kitchen. He declared, “And I had the best dinner I had had for months .. Boeufe corne’ au cabeau!”
 
4. Teach a child to help with household chores, a definite part of his and his eight siblings’ upbringing. Family stories mention such things as “Grover” doing laundry with his mother, or rocking his younger siblings to sleep. He recalled, “Often and often as a boy, I was compelled to get out of my warm bed at night to hang up a hat or other garment I had left on the floor.”
5. Drink a pint, and sing! 2021’s version might be karaoke and drinking a toast with friends on Zoom or Skype. The German beer gardens and Irish pubs of 1860s Buffalo were the go-to for the twenty-something to thirty-something future president, who enjoyed both beer and singing, and frequently.
6. Get outdoors at Essex County’s Grover Cleveland Park, or drive to a rural trail in the country, and get in nature. Cleveland loved the outdoors. Fishing, hunting, and just walking. He wrote often of how the outdoors was a great benefit to health and well-being.
7. Sing together at home. The Cleveland children sang together every night with their parents.
8. Guide, or substantially help, a family member struggling to save for college. At fifteen years old, Cleveland’s meager earnings as a clerk at a general store helped to fund the college education of his older brothers. As a young adult he supported the education of his younger sisters, and in his old age, that of his nieces. At sixteen, since Cleveland took on being provider to his widowed mother and younger siblings, he never had the time or money to attend college, but he always valued higher education. To his last days, he would speak of how he had wished he could have had the means or time. It is interesting that at about sixteen years old, Cleveland was offered a full scholarship by a neighbor, but the condition that Cleveland must use his education to become a minister, caused him to decline the generous but entangled offer. He had all intentions of becoming a lawyer.
9. Spend time reading or studying a subject you love. Cleveland enjoyed poetry, historical biography and never forgetting his religious upbringing, regularly read the Bible. Cleveland became a lawyer by “reading for the law.”  He had the gift of memorization from a very young age. A story in his law firm went that his dear friend and law partner, Oscar Folsom, relied heavily on Cleveland’s ability to recite precedents from memory. At one point, Cleveland retorted, “Go look it up, and then you’ll remember what you learn.” Folsom replied, “I want you to know, that I practice law by ear, not by note!” then turned on his heel and walked away.
10. View a classic stage play. Especially during his post-presidency years, Cleveland and his family loved the theater, attending Broadway shows regularly. Later, his youngest son would become an actor, and help co-found a summer theater in New Hampshire.
11. Have your life insurance in order as a tribute to Cleveland’s dedication to trustworthy life insurance policies. He labored long hard hours in his late years stabilizing a major company in the life insurance industry at a time when he said, “its policyholders were distressed with fear and gloomy forebodings” from which he eventually corrected the, “breach of trust….pending its reformation.”  He continued as a strong advocate of life insurance during his twilight years.
12. And last, but not least: Consider entering politics as a public service. Cleveland felt his time serving in assorted public offices was his personal sacrifice and offering to his community and his country. He encouraged others who had the energy, honesty and intelligence to do the same.

News on the Grover Cleveland Birthplace Visitor’s Center

The Grover Cleveland Birthplace Memorial Association is proud to announce that after many years of planning and development, the Grover Cleveland Birthplace Visitor’s Center will be built this year.  The contractor, Santorini Construction Inc  of Neptune, N.J., has been approved and the order to proceed has been given through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of parks and Forestry.  Completing a project in the works for the last 10 years, the GCBMA has been working with the State of New Jersey to build a new Visitor’s Center at the Grover Cleveland Birthplace in Caldwell, N.J.  Many state agencies have been involved, including the New Jersey State Historic Preservation Office, the Department of Environmental Protection, the Division of Parks and Forestry, the NJ Department  of the Treasury and the Division of Building and Construction.
A planning grant awarded to the GCBMA from the N.J. Historic Trust, combined with funds provided by the GCBMA, paid for the architectural design, survey, permits, soil testing, stabilization, and other planning costs.  When completed, the GCBMA will furnish and equip the center for the public’s use.  Funding these construction expenses mixed state money with donations, membership fees, and fundraising activities organized by the GCBMA.
The Visitor’s Center will be a very welcome addition to New Jersey History and Tourism.  First, it is a heritage tourism site which has grown from 600 to 6,000 visitors a year.  Second, it will be able to serve more people with visits from school classes, senior citizens, and tourists who want to see the attraction and an example of suburban America in a historic downtown.  Third, the tourists will feel safer without having to worry about crossing a street to park or to use a restroom.  Fourth, the center will provide a meeting place for civic groups, historical and cultural organizations, and expanded programming for the community.  The new capacity will be for 106 people with 49 more planned in the second phase.  Fifth, heritage tourism will provide jobs and continuing revenue for the West Essex communities  and their economies.
Early in the 20th century, the home was purchased by private citizens to be a museum in honor of Grover Cleveland.  In the 1930’s, the museum was given to the State of New Jersey by the original GCBMA to maintain.  Since the 1980’s, the current GCBMA has served as a private non-profit corporation to help promote the Birthplace and the legacy of Cleveland in the context of N.J. history.
The construction should take about 240 days and the grand opening ceremony is planned for the spring of 2021. The historical architects are Connolly and Hickey from Cranford, N.J.  The visitor’s center wraps around two walls of the circa 1900 Carriage House to permit visitors to see its construction in all weather.

Visitors Center Construction to Begin at Grover Cleveland Birthplace, Caldwell, New Jersey

The Grover Cleveland Birthplace Memorial Association is proud to announce that after many years of planning and development, the Grover Cleveland Birthplace Visitors Center will be built this year. The contractor, Santorini Construction, Inc., has been approved by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Parks and Forestry – the agency that manages the State Historic Site at 207 Bloomfield Avenue, Caldwell, New Jersey. Completing a project in the works for the last 10 years, the GCBMA has been working with the State of New Jersey to build a new Visitors Center and many agencies have been involved, including the New Jersey State Historic Preservation Office, the Department of Environmental Protection, the Division of Parks and Forestry, the New Jersey Department of the Treasury, and the Division of Building and Construction.

A planning grant awarded to the GCBMA from the New Jersey Historic Trust, combined with funds provided by the GCBMA, paid for the architectural design, survey, permits, soil testing, stabilization, and other planning costs. When completed, the GCBMA will furnish the birthplace and equip the center. Funding these construction expenses mixed state money with donations, membership fees, and fundraising activities organized by the GCBMA.

The Visitors Center will provide space for educational programs about Grover Cleveland and his role in American History, a gift store, additional museum displays, meeting rooms, and restrooms. It will serve as a reception area for individuals and school groups when visiting the Birthplace. The circa 1832 Birthplace is the “Old Manse” of the First Presbyterian Church at Caldwell where Cleveland’s father served as the minister.

The Visitors Center will be a very welcome addition to New Jersey history and tourism. First, it is a heritage tourism site which has grown from 600 to 6,000 visitors a year. Second, it will be able to serve more people with visits from school classes, senior citizens, and tourists who want to see the attraction and an example of suburban America in a historic downtown. Third, the tourists will feel safer without having to worry about crossing a street to park or to use a restroom. Fourth, the center will provide a meeting place for civic groups, historical and cultural organizations, and expanded programming for the community. The new facility will have a capacity for 106 guests with 49 more spaces in the second phase. Fifth, the visitor center will provide jobs and continuing revenue for the West Essex stores, restaurants, and shops for years to come.

Early in the 20th century the home was purchased by private citizens to be a museum in honor of Grover Cleveland. In the 1930’s, the museum was given to the State of New Jersey by the original GCBMA to maintain. Since the 1980’s, the current GCBMA has served as a 501(c)(3) private non-profit corporation to help promote the Birthplace and the legacy of Cleveland in the context of News Jersey history.

The construction should take about 240 days and the grand opening ceremony will be in the spring of 2021. The historical architects are Connolly and Hickey from Cranford, New Jersey. The Visitors Center wraps around the circa 1900 Carriage House to permit visitors to see its construction in all weather and appreciate its construction materials.

Virtual – July 4th 2020

Welcome to The GCBMA’s VIRTUAL July 4th Experience!

Fun Facts, Trivia, Activities, Events & More

Nifty July 4th Fun Facts                                     Winning Cookie Recipes                              July 4th Jokes (real groaners) 
July 4th White House Celebrations               Color Grover Coloring Book                       Oh! Say Can You See Flag Quiz
Cleveland’ s Caldwell Quiz                              
Make Your Own Ice Cream                        Thomas Jefferson’s Original Ice Cream
July 4, 1914 Caldwell Fireworks Disaster     Print Out Your Own Mini Grover

                      Click Here for your virtual tour of the Grover Cleveland Birthplace
What Independence Day Meant to Grover Cleveland?”    Youtube or Transcript
Click Here to join us for a reading of the Declaration of Independence as written in 1776, by State Park Service staff, volunteers and friends.

 

The Grover Cleveland Birthplace Memorial Association’s (GCBMA’s) Ice Cream Socials have been part of the West Essex community celebration since 1987, the 150th anniversary of Stephen Grover Cleveland’s birth in the Old Manse – better known to us as the Grover Cleveland Birthplace.

In the last few years attendance to our annual July 4th event has grown to nearly 1000 people. But the annual Ice Cream Social is not solely the work of the GCBMA alone.

Here are just some of the many supporters and volunteers who have made our Annual July 4th Ice Cream Socials possible. The GCBMA extends special thanks to:

Animal Welfare League
Boy Scout Troop 6
Calandra’s Bakery
Cloverleaf Tavern
Dee Jay Angelo Uccello
Essex Lodge No. 7 Lodge F. & A. M.

Gelotti Ice Cream
George Esparza, the Medicine Man and Flea Circus Master
Jack’s Foodtown
James Caldwell High School Service Club
Kiwanis Club of Caldwell – West Essex
Local Fire Departments & West Essex First Aid Squad
Marco the Magician
New Jersey State Parks Service
Reisinger Oxygen Service

Rev. Msgr. Robert Emery of Saint Aloysius Roman Catholic Church
Rollins Lawns
Rotary Club of the Caldwells
Saint Aloysius Roman Catholic Church

Sharon Farrell, Caretaker of the Grover Cleveland Birthplace
& Staff Members Janice Caputo and Paula Tomshe

ShopRite of West Caldwell
The Party Store
West Essex Ministerial Association
Women’s of Club of Caldwell